You are in a position next to the green with a tight lie and not much green to work with…Playing a regular chip shot would put you over the green and a bump shot just isn’t the play. What you really need is a shot that will get the ball up quickly and land softly without much release. This can be achieved by hitting a flop shot. A flop shot is used typically with an open clubface and a wedge ranging from 56* to 60*. Let’s go over the technique…

Like I said above, you need to open the clubface almost flat so that the toe is almost touching the ground. The first lie I will go over is a tight lie, meaning off of a fairway or first cut. The focus here is that you want to move your weight forward onto your front foot. This will allow the clubhead to drive into the ground, effectively using the bounce of the club allowing the ball to pop up. The key to the flop shot is that with your follow-through, your arms and clubhead must be accelerating together through impact keeping your left arm straight and finishing with the follow-through. Meaning that your wrists do not break, which could cause the leading edge to come up off of the ground and hit the center of the ball, resulting in a bladed shot.

Now off of a lie where the ball is sitting down, you will keep the same principle of opening up the clubface and swinging your arms and clubhead together. The one thing that will change is that your weight will become more level between your two feet like a normal shot. This will change the arc of your club resulting in the club not driving so much into the ground.

The next time you find yourself in a position that a flop shot will be effective, go ahead and assess the lie and play the shot accordingly. Try this technique and you will find yourself hitting the flop shot close to the hole.

Brett Bennett