11/28/2016

In the golf world today, golfers have worlds of “advice” at the tips of their fingers. There’s content all over the web, instructional videos throughout YouTube, and even tips you can find on Twitter. Much of this can be accessed simply by smartphone.

Now it’s easy to be engulfed and overwhelmed.

Imagine trying to buy a car with no prior knowledge of the car industry. The sheer amount of content out there on Acuras, Kias, Fords, Chevys, and more is enough to make your head spin with crippling doubt. That sensation is definitely true about golf instruction on the internet. There is so much out there.

So how do you know what online golf instruction is any good?

One key thing we’ve learned here at USGolfTV is that getting your information from a consistent source is paramount. This doesn’t limit you to only one source (although that can have benefits too), but not all information in the golf world is necessarily good information. Or relevant. And it may contradict other things you’re hearing. Consistency in your learning sources will help you be consistent on the golf course.

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We’ve kept our fingers on the pulse within the online golf industry for going on 8 years now. Our teaching staff has been teaching the game for over 25 years, even before we made an online presence. Over time, we’ve started to learn about golf instructors throughout the world and what there teaching.

Here is a list of 5 golf instructions you may not have ever heard of, but that are changing the golf industry.

Follow them on Twitter, watch their content on YouTube, and keep tabs with them. You’ll learn a thing or two. This list isn’t in a particular order, nor is it comprehensive. It’s just 5 guys we like learning from. They are sources of information that we trust.

Here we go:


1. Martin Chuck

Now Martin Chuck can be found on Twitter under the handle @tourstriker. The name is an ode to a product Chuck uses in his instruction often, one he invented, called the Tour Striker. Go through his Twitter page and website and you’ll find all about it.

Chuck has a vast array of content he shares on social media, as well as on his YouTube page. He’s extremely friendly on Twitter and if you reach out, there’s a good chance you’ll hear back from him in some capacity. He’s a Cobra/Puma guy, so give him heads up on Rickie Fowler or Bryson DeChambeau and he may appreciate it.

Chuck is well-connected, well-respected, and very friendly. He’s a great source to follow if you’d like keep up with the golf industry and learn a thing or two.

Here’s a testimonial of Chuck’s work from his YouTube page. He hosted an event at Bandon Dunes in Oregon:


2. Joseph Mayo

He is the TrackmanMaestro, a man who understands the golf swing intimately. Don’t type in “Mayo” if you’re looking for him on Twitter, just go to @TrackmanMaestro and you’ll find him there. For those of you who don’t know, ‘maestro’ is Spanish for “teacher.” So he’s the Trackman Teacher, the guy who can tell you anything you need to know about the numbers in the game.

As technology has changed, golf has followed suit. The Trackman device is one that uses doppler radar to read specific information about the flight of a golf ball, similar to the Flightscope. It reads launch angle, spin rates, ball speed, club speed, apex, distance, carry, landing angle, and so much more. Mayo knows these numbers on the Trackman. He is the teacher. And he has a lot of information to share with the world.

Mayo is the Director of Instruction at TPC Summerlin in Las Vegas, Nevada. He works with golfers of various skill levels, including players on the PGA and LPGA Tour levels. His hallmark Tour pro includes Brian Gay among others, and he is a wealth of information for how to optimize one’s golf game. He has partnered with Grant Waite, a former PGA Tour player with a gorgeous golf swing, and together the two of them work to improve people’s understanding of golf.

Scroll through his accounts and you’ll learn a few valuable nuggets for how to improve your own game. It’s interesting as well, when Mayo takes a look at the game’s greatest players and shows what makes them so effective.

If you want to engage with Joseph, he’s posting content on Vimeo fairly frequently, as well as on Instagram and the aforementioned Twitter account. Find him on YouTube, as well.

He has a sense of humor and strong convictions with what he knows about the game of golf. It’s good stuff!

 

In the past, Waite and Mayo have shot video along with us. Here’s a great piece of video instruction:

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3. Brian Manzella

This is a name that’s been in golf instruction circles for a very long time. And he knows the golf swing very, very well.

The Brian Manzella Golf Academy has a forum that always has interesting dialogue taking place. If you visit, you’ll see people starting discussions about the golf swing and Brian facilitating. You’ll need to register (you can do that on the top right) by providing some simple information and agree to his forum’s terms. Great conversations taking place inside.

Manzella still has a ton of great content on YouTube and you can sit and learn and listen to him for hours. He also has a Vimeo page, where he’ll talk about things like “What Golf Science Is.” and “Explaining a Lead Wrist Graph.”

He’s also the Admin on the Facebook page alongside Michael Jacobs called “Post Modern Golf.” A closed group with some 2,200+ members, you’ll have to request access, but the dialogue inside goes deep. If you’re new to the game, this is NOT the place for you. But if you like “nerding out,” this is a forum with a lot of interesting posts.

Manzella isn’t extremely active on Twitter, but he’s still on it and we’d encourage you follow him. He has many great opinions on the golf swing that have made him a thought leader in golf teaching.


4. Todd Kolb

todd kolb

Over the past 20 years, Todd Kolb has become one of the Midwest’s best, and most trusted, golf instructors.

In his home state of South Dakota, he teaches out of the Todd Kolb Golf Academy where he and his team work with some of the most dedicated junior golfers in the region. Kolb also has a growing cast of professional golfers which have built long-term, stable relationships founded on trust. He will share tweets from them periodically.

Todd is active across all social media platforms including his Twitter page (@toddkolbgolf) and his Instagram page. One can also learn from him in literally hundreds of videos on the USGolfTV YouTube page. Todd has experience working with golfers from all skill levels and explains his approach in simple, easy to understand terms. He describes his style of teaching as “coaching,” where he works with more than just a golfer’s swing—he works to shape the person.

If you’re a golfer looking to fix your slice, Todd is also the mastermind behind the Tour Draw system, a program developed here at USGolfTV where golfers have transformed their ball flights.

Todd is a great follow if you want to learn and follow the journey of many others looking to do the same.


5. Andrew Rice

Andrew Rice is another one of those names that seems to be at the forefront of golf instruction discovery. He’s a brilliant mind with an excellent way of sharing his newly-found knowledge with the world.

Andrew Rice can be found on Twitter at @AndrewRiceGolf. To over 15,000 Twitter followers, Rice is sharing great content from his blog, his teaching sessions, and dialogue with other instructors in the industry. He’s an encouraging speaker and a insightful thinker. Rice is doing many great things for golf.

On his website, Rice has become a bit of an authority at understanding wedges. He writes many great pieces (with video) that help share his ideas. He likes the hashtag #WedgeProject. Here are a few great ones:

Rice has also taken part in podcasts and interviews. This interview with Cordie Walker was an introduction into more wedge work they had done.

His YouTube page is a great place to binge and watch hours of great video content.


These instructors are great sources of quality golf content. If you listen to them, you’ll learn. And if you learn, you’ll have the chance to improve.